Blue-billed Duck and Freckled Duck at the Western Treatment Plant

Pretty much every duck in Victoria can be see at the Western Treatment Plant. The only exception might be the Plumed Whistling Duck, which is not easy to see in Victoria at all.

However, there are two ducks that you have a chance of seeing but are not so easy at all: Freckled Duck and Blue-billed Duck. If you do see them, chances are you’ll see 1-2 individuals, compared to the thousands of Australian Shelducks in the summer. Actually, you have a much better chance of seeing them at Lake Lorne in Geelong, but if you don’t want to make a detour there, here’s something you can try at the Western Treatment Plant.

Go to Lake Borrie via the first entrance on Point Wilson (Gate #5). After going through Gate #6, go in the direction of the red arrow:

As you pass the the head of the arrow, look to the right. For some reason, this smaller inlet seems to be a haven for these rarer ducks. Now you pretty much have to scan every duck with binoculars. Look around quickly because these ducks have a tendency to swim away if they can tell that you’re there. Here is a Blue-billed Duck we saw the last time we were there, and we’ve seen it more than once:

Yes, it’s a male Blue-billed Duck! Keep in mind that the Blue-billed Duck can dive underwater so it pays to look at every area a couple of times. The Blue-billed Duck has an intricate mating display that involves water splashing but we’ve never seen it.

If you can tick the Blue-billed Duck and Freckled Duck, then the other ducks in Victoria should be a piece of cake. After that, one trip to Cairns and the surrounding areas should allow you to see every duck in Australia! (I’m excluding the Northern Mallard here.)

Hey, I don’t have a problem sharing my freckled duck.

Whenever we go to the Western Treatment Plant, the goal is to get a super sharp photo of a new species of bird that we haven’t seen before. However, I usually end up taking pictures not just of the birds, but of the scenery around the birds, which is stunning. Whenever I tell our non-birder friends that we visit a sewage farm, they raise an eyebrow or two. In fact, if they had more than two eyebrows I think they’d probably raise those as well. Anyway, I don’t care, they can pinch their nose or hold it high. Just means more pelicans at the plant for us birders to enjoy alone.

Don’t these pelicans look like ships coming into the harbour? You can also see a royal and a yellow Spoonbill just slightly off centre as well.

Of course, for every sharp picture I take, there are at least ten other blurry ones. Thank goodness for digital cameras. Often these blurry pictures still amuse me, such as this one of australasian pelican and silver gull:

Look, they’re snuggling! They’re friends!

And sometimes, the blurry pictures look impressionistic. Such as this one of all these black swans swimming in the sun:


However, I can’t really call my picture of the freckled duck impressionistic. But since our blog is called “Bad Birding,” I figure the standard is low enough that nobody really expects to see a National Geographic-quality freckled duck. Unlike Jason, I’m so proud of our find that I want to showcase it on the blog. I’m not ashamed of my picture. That’s right! I’ve been trying to find the freckled duck in Lake Borie for almost a year.

During the past year, usually when I scanned the waters they looked like this:

This water gives so many ducks, but sadly not freckled ones.

Finally, just before the year was up, that rare little duck showed its cute freckled ski-slope head in part of Lake Borie just before you reach the Bird Hide. And there were two of them! Even better. Ladies and Gentlemen, here they are:

Swimming in the front with three hard head friends.

Even though we’ve seen the blue-billed duck at the Western Treatment Plant, it was even farther away than these guys and I’d love to get a closer look sometime. Well, hopefully with some luck and persistence we’ll get a decent sighting of the blue-billed duck as well. Any tips?

These little black cormorants on a log remind me of Jason and the Argonauts.

Rails and Freckled Duck at the Western Treatment Plant

Last week when we visited the Western Treatment Plant we woke up at 5:30AM to hopefully get a glimpse of rails before everyone else scared them away. In the Lake Borrie area we took a short break to apply some sunscreen and a Buff-banded Rail (Hypotaenidia philippensis) scurried out to cross the path! Not too long after a second one ran across as well. Cautiously approaching the area we found it in the bushes:

The secretive Buff-banded Rail is found mostly near the coast all over Australia…if you can find it at all!

This image shows the secretive nature of rails. You can see its lovely patterned plumage through the reeds. Just a little after another small crake ran across a different path but unfortunately we didn’t get a good enough glimpse of it to identify it or appreciate its mystical quality.

Nearby singing was a Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo (Chalcites basalis):

This Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo is likely to have been raised by a Fairy-wren!

We also got a great glimpse of the Freckled Duck (Stictonetta naevosa)! Sadly, my lens wasn’t long enough to get a shot I would consider showing on this blog. We’ve been looking for the Freckled Duck for a year!

There were a few differences between this early morning and some of the later times we visited. For one, there were many more Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata) scurrying about on the ground, rather than the few we usually see.

A male Zebra Finch.

Another difference was that we saw an unusual number of rabbits, which was unfortunatley introduced into Australia in 1858. This mammal has caused significant ecological damage since then.