Recent Yarra Bend Park Walk: Frogmouth and Rat

Even though the Yarra Bend Park is urban, some cool things can still be found in it. For instance, this week we went for a walk and we found four Tawny Frogmouths! Here are two:

As bad birders we often look for things that aren’t birds. So on this same walk we were thrilled to see this Water Rat (Hydromys chrysogaster) dragging a huge fish onto the bank:

It took several bites and just swam away!

Rails and Freckled Duck at the Western Treatment Plant

Last week when we visited the Western Treatment Plant we woke up at 5:30AM to hopefully get a glimpse of rails before everyone else scared them away. In the Lake Borrie area we took a short break to apply some sunscreen and a Buff-banded Rail (Hypotaenidia philippensis) scurried out to cross the path! Not too long after a second one ran across as well. Cautiously approaching the area we found it in the bushes:

The secretive Buff-banded Rail is found mostly near the coast all over Australia…if you can find it at all!

This image shows the secretive nature of rails. You can see its lovely patterned plumage through the reeds. Just a little after another small crake ran across a different path but unfortunately we didn’t get a good enough glimpse of it to identify it or appreciate its mystical quality.

Nearby singing was a Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo (Chalcites basalis):

This Horsfield’s Bronze Cuckoo is likely to have been raised by a Fairy-wren!

We also got a great glimpse of the Freckled Duck (Stictonetta naevosa)! Sadly, my lens wasn’t long enough to get a shot I would consider showing on this blog. We’ve been looking for the Freckled Duck for a year!

There were a few differences between this early morning and some of the later times we visited. For one, there were many more Zebra Finches (Taeniopygia guttata) scurrying about on the ground, rather than the few we usually see.

A male Zebra Finch.

Another difference was that we saw an unusual number of rabbits, which was unfortunatley introduced into Australia in 1858. This mammal has caused significant ecological damage since then.