Hey, I don’t have a problem sharing my freckled duck.

Whenever we go to the Western Treatment Plant, the goal is to get a super sharp photo of a new species of bird that we haven’t seen before. However, I usually end up taking pictures not just of the birds, but of the scenery around the birds, which is stunning. Whenever I tell our non-birder friends that we visit a sewage farm, they raise an eyebrow or two. In fact, if they had more than two eyebrows I think they’d probably raise those as well. Anyway, I don’t care, they can pinch their nose or hold it high. Just means more pelicans at the plant for us birders to enjoy alone.

Don’t these pelicans look like ships coming into the harbour? You can also see a royal and a yellow Spoonbill just slightly off centre as well.

Of course, for every sharp picture I take, there are at least ten other blurry ones. Thank goodness for digital cameras. Often these blurry pictures still amuse me, such as this one of australasian pelican and silver gull:

Look, they’re snuggling! They’re friends!

And sometimes, the blurry pictures look impressionistic. Such as this one of all these black swans swimming in the sun:


However, I can’t really call my picture of the freckled duck impressionistic. But since our blog is called “Bad Birding,” I figure the standard is low enough that nobody really expects to see a National Geographic-quality freckled duck. Unlike Jason, I’m so proud of our find that I want to showcase it on the blog. I’m not ashamed of my picture. That’s right! I’ve been trying to find the freckled duck in Lake Borie for almost a year.

During the past year, usually when I scanned the waters they looked like this:

This water gives so many ducks, but sadly not freckled ones.

Finally, just before the year was up, that rare little duck showed its cute freckled ski-slope head in part of Lake Borie just before you reach the Bird Hide. And there were two of them! Even better. Ladies and Gentlemen, here they are:

Swimming in the front with three hard head friends.

Even though we’ve seen the blue-billed duck at the Western Treatment Plant, it was even farther away than these guys and I’d love to get a closer look sometime. Well, hopefully with some luck and persistence we’ll get a decent sighting of the blue-billed duck as well. Any tips?

These little black cormorants on a log remind me of Jason and the Argonauts.

Five Myths About Watching Birds

1. You need to get up early

You can absolutely see many birds without ever getting up early. It’s true that birds are often more active in the earliest of mornings, and some species might only be seen then, but there are also hundreds of species that you can see at 11AM as well. As long as you travel around a bit, you can literally find new species for years before having to get up early.

Instead of getting up early, why not go birding in the evening and enjoy the sunset at the same time? Photo by Jason Polak at Casuarina Coastal Reserve, Darwin.

2. You must travel to exotic locations

Definitely false! Of the 219 species we’ve seen in Australia so far, we’ve seen 61 in Melbourne, though Melbourne was not always the first place we saw them. Just check out eBird and see how many cool birds are spotted just around the corner. Birds are everywhere. That’s the cool thing about them.

But don’t expect to see the Night Parrot in Melbourne. Eventually you’ll probably want to travel a bit: we’ve driven almost 5000km just to get up to 219 species (and counting)!

This Little Black Cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) was seen right in Melbourne’s Royal Botanic Gardens. No traveling necessary! Photo by Jason Polak.

3. You need to know the difference between scapulars and tertials to be a birder

That is, you need to know about bird anatomy. A little technical knowledge can enhance bird appreciation but it is not at all necessary for the vast majority of bird identification problems. Most birds are easy to identify. All it takes a field guide and some patience.

Can you tell whether this Cape Barren Goose (Cereopsis novaehollandiae) is male or female? Cause I sure can’t! Photo by Jason Polak.

Continue reading “Five Myths About Watching Birds”

Why does this blog exist?

It might surprise you to know that a year ago, I wasn’t interested in birds. Coming to Australia changed that. Pretty soon after Emily and I arrived, we started ranking up species, starting with the Common Mynah and Rainbow Lorikeet. Now we’ve been here for nearly a year and we’ve got 138 species, the latest being the Crested Shrike-tit.

Birding is something we do in our spare time and we’re only here for two years in total, so we want to see as many birds as possible. One of our goals is to see 200 species, so we have 62 more to go. I hope we’ll probably see more than that.

This blog exists to chronicle some of our efforts. So do check back every once and a while and follow our progress!

A City Filled with Lorikeets

It wouldn’t be bad birding, if I didn’t comment on how many lorikeets we’ve seen.

Now, the number of lorikeets we’ve seen is simply astounding. The other night we were going for a walk in Yarra Bend, and we must have seen at least 50.

And they all were rainbow.

Now, I have nothing against the rainbow lorikeet.

In fact, it’s thanks to this beautiful bird that we became interested in birds at all. Jason spotted them first in Fitzroy Gardens and we were like, “Is that a parrot? I think that’s a parrot.”

And then later, I started thinking, “Okay so we saw a parrot. But what kind of parrot was it?”

Then I found the answer on birds and backyards. Next I had to look up every single other parrot-like bird we saw (sulphur-crested cockatoo, red rumped parrot, gallah), and then that turned into having to look up every bird we saw, and then Jason came on board, and then you know it became serious.

However, in the spirit of bad birding, we haven’t found any lorikeets besides the rainbow lorikeet. And not for lack of trying. There’s supposed to be the little lorikeet, the musk lorikeet, and the purple crowned lorikeet living among us in Melbourne. Yet, we haven’t seen head, tail, or feather of them.

Meanwhile, some dude’s busy mocking us by posting a sighting of musk lorikeet at Melbourne uni! Following in his footsteps we checked out the System Garden at the university and found… rock dove.

So other lorikeets, where are you hiding?