New Video: Wildlife in Northeastern Queensland!

Jason promised you all a cassowary mating video in his comprehensive post about our trip to Northeastern Queensland in March. Well, finally after an international move to Canada, I am ready to deliver the goods. My nature documentary of our trip contains lots of birds such as the afore-mentioned cassowaries, but also includes some crabs, mudskippers, and lizards. I hope you all enjoy it! Such a beautiful place in the world, I’d go back in a heartbeat.

Basically in this video I’m like my idol, David Attenborough, if he was Canadian, female, and had less high tech camera equipment (so basically I’m nothing like David Attenborough)! All photographs and video footage taken by me, except for the infamous photo of the white-tailed rat which was taken by Jason Polak. And yes, that’s my voice. 🙂 Thanks to all the friendly Australians and like-minded naturalists we met on the trip who were so enthusiastic with sharing their birding tips and tricks with us. You helped make this a trip to remember.

PS: If you like this video, you may also like my nature documentary of our trip to the Northern Territory.

Thank you, bagpipes

The other day we sat down for a rest in Vincent Massey park. Seemingly unfortunately, we were greeted with the sound of bagpipes. Obviously, we couldn’t rest with that kind of sound going off in our ears so we walked to a new spot. A few minutes later this beautiful owl flew into a tree very close to us:

Great-horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)

It was truly an amazing view, and we wouldn’t have seen it if it weren’t for those bagpipes driving us away!

This is in fact the second owl we’ve seen on our quest to see the world’s birds (339 and counting). The first was the Rufous Owl that we saw in the George Brown botanic garden in Darwin:

Rufous Owl (Ninox rufa)

Perhaps this means we’ll see even more owls in the future?

Canada, So Far

Canada and Australia: how do they compare in terms of birds? Canada is without a doubt more challenging. The time spent to good sightings ratio is higher. In Australia, great views were easy. There were all sorts of huge, colourful birds practically flying in our face.

But, we’ve made some good Canadian progress. Check out our bird list to see that we’ve seen 39 new species here in Canada (there are a couple more to add, too).

And we’ve gotten some good sightings here, no doubt. For instance, last month we had an amazing view of Northern Cardinal: