Melbourne Royal Botanic Gardens

Located near Melbourne CBD, the Royal Botanic Gardens consists of a variety of habitats such as lakes and different forests and plant collections from different parts of the world.

When’s a good time to go? Probably any time of the year will result in many of the birds mentioned below.However, I recommend going in the cooler months, as in the peak of summer the grounds get so crowded with tourists that it pretty much negates the enjoyment of seeing the plants and birds. And speaking of the birds…

The gardens has a stable Bell Miner colony in the northwest corner near the ornamental lake and seeing one is not difficult. You’ll know you’ve found the colony by the multiple short, bell-like calls that emanate from it. The ornamental lake is also a great site to see waterbirds, the most common probably being Purple Swamphen, Dusky Moorhen, Eurasian Coot, Pacific Black Duck, and Grey and Chestnut Teal. Less numerous are Australasian Grebe, Hardhead, and Little Pied Cormorant. We’ve seen the Nankeen Night Heron twice.

The Australasian Grebe is often found in the ornamental lakes. Photo by Jason Polak

The most common parrots are Sulphur-crested Cockatoo and Rainbow Lorikeet. The other day someone on eBird saw a flock of Long-billed and Little Corellas, though this isn’t very common.

We’ve seen a few interesting species near the bathroom directly east from Rose Pavillion, including White-browed Scrubwren and Little Wattlebird. White-browed Scrubwen seems to keep to the forest floor and can be found under small bushes and around trees. Silvereye is often around, but difficult to see well because it moves around quickly. A good place to see it is near the glasshouse and Nymphaea Lily Lake. Eastern Spinebill is not always easy to find but a good time to see it could be May-June, when we’ve seen many.

The sneaky honeyeater Eastern Spinebill is a quick moving bird that seems easiest to see in the fall and early winter. Photo by Jason Polak.

There are also supposedly several other common small birds in the gardens that we’ve never found: Australian Reed-Warbler, Song Thrush, Golden Whistler, and Brown Thornbill. Oh, and of course the sneaky Spotted Pardalote! That’s not surprising though since it’s friend Striated Pardalote also gave us the slip in Terrick Terrick NP.

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