The Western Treatment Plant

The Western Treatment Plant, also known as ‘The Sewage Farm’ is one of my favourite places in Victoria, and it’s not because of the sewage. In fact, a lot of why I like this place is not even because it’s one of the richest birding spots in the south. I like this place because it’s quiet. Although popular with birders, it has fewer visitors than the average park and most of the time it has no people at all. And even when there are a few, birders mostly keep to themselves anyway.

The Western Treatment Plant has great scenery. You can sit by the ocean and appreciate the vast expanse of succulents and scrub, and if you’re there early in the summer you can see the huge purple thistles. Yes, this is indeed a peaceful place, and that’s probably why there are so many birds. In my mind there are three main types of birds around: the waterbirds, the raptors, and the skulking grass birds.

A typical view of the ocean at the plant: there are Black Swans, Silver Gulls, various ducks, and migrating shorebirds in the summer. Photo by Jason Polak.

The main birding attraction is probably the waterbirds such as the migratory shorebirds in the summer. There are hundreds of Red-necked Stints, and if you’ve got time to look you could probably identify several more in their feeding frenzy. Also present mostly in the summer are the difficult-to-identify terns. I suggest taking lots of pictures and examing them at home.
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Why does this blog exist?

It might surprise you to know that a year ago, I wasn’t interested in birds. Coming to Australia changed that. Pretty soon after Emily and I arrived, we started ranking up species, starting with the Common Mynah and Rainbow Lorikeet. Now we’ve been here for nearly a year and we’ve got 138 species, the latest being the Crested Shrike-tit.

Birding is something we do in our spare time and we’re only here for two years in total, so we want to see as many birds as possible. One of our goals is to see 200 species, so we have 62 more to go. I hope we’ll probably see more than that.

This blog exists to chronicle some of our efforts. So do check back every once and a while and follow our progress!

Our Visit to Terrick Terrick National Park

Terrick Terrick National Park (TTNP) is located just over 200km north of Melbourne, and comprises of light forest and grasslands. There is a single campsite along with an outhouse and picnic area situated near a large rocky hill called Mount Terrick Terrick.

So how’s the birding? The picnic area abounds with little brown birds like Jacky Winter and Brown Treecreeper. Near the cemetery not far from the picnic area we saw White-browed babbler, Red-capped Robin, and one of either Brown Goshawk or Collared Sparrowhawk.

Reigel’s Rock – It’s a big rock.

Now there are two large rock formations in the park aside from Mount Terrick Terrick: Bennett’s Rock and Reigel’s Rock. In fact from the top of any of these, you can see the other two. Both sites are a meeting of the forest and rockier habitats and proved to be great birding. Reigel’s Rock was first on our list, and on the way we saw a kangaroo drinking site. This region is a little different than the more forested area of the park, being more sparse and rocky.
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Finally Tawny Frogmouth!

 

Our bird books all say the tawny frogmouth is a common bird in the Melbourne area and I’ve been keen to see it for a while. Whenever we go for a walk in Yarra Bend Park I always look at trees and point to a small piece of wood sticking up, believing that I’ve spotted it. Since, after all, the tawny frogmouth’s ability to blend in with eucalyptus bark is nothing short of legendary. Continue reading “Finally Tawny Frogmouth!”